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The Pane Info

System Information

The item System Information lists technical details about the current computer system. This includes data not accessible by the System Information application (also known as System Profiler) of Mac OS X.

The section Computer contains the marketing name of the computer, the internal type code used by Apple to identify this model series, the system’s serial number, its unique identification (UUID), and the date and place of production.

System information
System information

The second section Hardware Information lists details about the processor and system bus configuration, as well as the available cache and main memory sizes. After pressing the button More Info…, technical details about the CPU(s) will be shown. This includes the full identification label of the processor(s), Intel’s family, model and stepping numbers, the number of cores, and the number of physical and virtual address bits.

x86 processor information
x86 processor information

The entry Capable of 64 bit operation does not indicate whether your system has a 64-bit or 32-bit processor. It shows whether the current combination of processor, mainboard, firmware and operating system would allow full 64-bit operation. The analysis is done by Mac OS X, not by TinkerTool System.

Another detail sheet, available via the button Show management records… lists technical information which has been stored into the management memory of the computer. It includes:

These management records are not computed by TinkerTool System but only retrieved by it. They have been stored by the manufacturer into the so-called System Management BIOS area of the system’s firmware when the computer was assembled.

System management information
System management information

It is possible to either print the contents of the main information window, or to save it into an HTML-based text file. Such documents can be used to automatically generate inventory records for all your computers. Press the buttons Print… or Save as text…, respectively. Created text files can be opened by any web browser or by the TextEdit application included with Mac OS X.

Malware Protection

Mac OS X offers multiple built-in security measures against malicious software (malware). One of these security features works like a virus scanner which automatically scans downloaded files, searching for known code patterns (signatures) in the background. Apple refers to this technology as Safe Downloads List. Its function is enabled by default. The virus signatures are automatically updated once per day if necessary. In addition to detecting malicious software, this component also monitors the version numbers of specific Internet plug-ins installed in the system. Such plug-ins are used by Internet browsers to support optional web technologies like Adobe® Flash® or Java™.

Malware protection
Malware protection

Using the tab item Malware Protection, you can review the current contents of the Safe Downloads List. The upper table shows the malicious programs which can be recognized by the operating system at the moment. The name of the malware, as defined by Apple, and the file types used for the distribution of the software are listed.

The lower table lists the Internet plug-ins which are monitored by the operating system, checking them for outdated versions. The name of each plug-in and the versions which are considered to be critical are shown.

Below the tables, TinkerTool System displays when Apple has revised the list for the last time, when the list has been transferred to this computer, and in which time intervals the operating system checks whether a new version of the list is available.

Please note the following points:

Logs and Reports

After selecting the tab item Logs and Reports, you will have direct access to more than 100 categories of log recordings kept by Mac OS X and Mac OS X Server. The operating system collects notification, warning and error messages in such files, especially for components of the system which don’t have a direct graphical user interface. Administrators can use this information to keep track and analyze problem situations which occurred in the past. Logs are simple text files which are filled line by line over time. Most services also note time and date in each line, so it becomes easier to understand the series of events that occurred.

Logs and reports
Logs and reports

The possibly available logs and reports are presented by a browser with two columns: The left column allows you to select the information category or service, the right column allows you to select between the available subcategories or detail reports. Either double-click an item at the right side or press the button Open to open the respective log. A text window will show you the contents of the selected log file. The log file currently in use by the operating system is presented first. If the system additionally holds archived log files containing older records, they can be displayed with the pop-up button Available archived logs in the lower left corner of the text window. Note that you can open as many windows simultaneously as you like. The logs can also be printed or saved into text files, using the respective buttons at the lower right corner of each window.

For security reasons, logs that may keep potentially confidential or security-critical information cannot be opened by every user. In this case Mac OS X asks for the credentials of a user with administrative permissions in order to access the contents of such specially protected logs. Some logs may be empty because you did not enable the associated service on your computer, or you are using the standard version of Mac OS X, but this service is available as part of Mac OS X Server only.